Studies VIII: The 14 January Front

This page includes a series of posts which will consist of translations and excerpts from the communiques, statements, pamphlets and other literature from left-wing political parties in the Arab world, especially Tunisia (others as well, Egypt, Algeria and Mauritania in particular). The selections will focus on foreign policy, women’s issues, relations with other political factions (mainly Islamists and other leftist tendencies), ideology, rhetoric and general worldview. The purpose of this series is to put into English elements of the contemporary Arab political discourse which are generally neglected in western and English-language reportage and analysis while the of Islamist tendency receives extensive, if not excessive coverage. The translations in this series should not be taken as this blogger endorsing or promoting the content of particular materials: the objective is to increase access to and understanding of the contemporary Arab left by making its perspectives known, especially in areas of interest and relevance to English-speakers. This series will include both leftist and Arab nationalist [party] documents, statements, communiques, articles and so on. The series will attempt to touch on as many of the main (and interesting) leftist parties as possible.

Below is an English translation of the founding statement of the 14 January Front (an alternative English translation can be read here), a coalition of Tunisian leftist parties formed after the overthrow of Zine al-Abdine Ben Ali (14 January was the day Ben Ali stepped down from office). The statement lays out the groups’ intentions to continue demonstrations until the “objectives of the revolution” are met, including the removal of Ben Ali-era officials and the overthrow of the interim Ghannouchi government. It appeals to the Tunisian people to continue protesting — “especially in the street” — to keep the interim authorities on their toes and politics in a constant state of play, lest elements of the old regime move things revert back to the way they were before the uprising. It is a strong representation of the arguments for “continuing” or “permanent revolution” made by many on the Tunisian left. This is a tendency also found among Egyptian leftists (reflecting the prominence of Trotskyist thought among many contemporary Arab leftwing factions; although, the Egyptian left is more overtly bourgeois in orientation than the Tunisian hard left (as seen in the 14 January Front and among older members of Ettajdid) and has stronger social democratic inclinations ideologically). Fundamentally, there is little trust that centrist Tunisian or Egyptian bourgeois democrats can be trusted to carry out revolutionary objectives and a belief that working class people must set and drive revolutionary objectives. Furthermore, the rhetoric of Arab revolutionaries of all orientations, but especially leftist ones, tends to call out for other Arab societies to join them in revolt. Contrary to some of the early writing in western presses about the limited objectives of Arab uprisings (notably with respect to Palestine) the chants and the statements of the groups and individuals partaking in uprisings this year frequently make reference to one another and call on other Arabs to sustain pressure for change in the region by rising up  – the Arab uprisings do not accept a concept of “revolution in one country” (even the Stalinists among them). As Hossam Hamalawy told NPR recently: “You cannot build a democracy in a country where you are surrounded by a sea or an ocean of dictatorships”.

On this tendency Marx set out on the subject (see here) arguing that the working class is tasked with organizing autonomously (hence, for example, the foundation of the Egyptian Workers Democratic Party (WDP), which describes itself as the country’s first party for workers) and pressing for driving “the proposals of the democrats to their logical extreme”:

[t]hey [revolutionaries] must drive the proposals of the democrats to their logical extreme (the democrats will in any case act in a reformist and not a revolutionary manner) and transform these proposals into direct attacks on private property. If, for instance, the petty bourgeoisie propose the purchase of the railways and factories, the workers must demand that these railways and factories simply be confiscated by the state without compensation as the property of reactionaries. [...] The demands of the workers will thus have to be adjusted according to the measures and concessions of the democrats.[. . .]

Although the German workers cannot come to power and achieve the realization of their class interests without passing through a protracted revolutionary development, this time they can at least be certain that the first act of the approaching revolutionary drama will coincide with the direct victory of their own class in France and will thereby be accelerated. But they themselves must contribute most to their final victory, by informing themselves of their own class interests, by taking up their independent political position as soon as possible, by not allowing themselves to be misled by the hypocritical phrases of the democratic petty bourgeoisie into doubting for one minute the necessity of an independently organized party of the proletariat. Their battle-cry must be: The Permanent Revolution.

In any case, the 14 January Front’s statement is widely available on the Internet on various party sites, forums and Facebook pages (it has its own website: http://front14janvier.net/). Since its formation, the front has gone through many changes of course and by now its collective strength has heavily eroded. It nevertheless remains a key element in understanding the evolution of the Tunisian left’s political development after the fall of Ben Ali. Understanding its objective also helps contextualize the ongoing protests by those described as the “far left”. 

“The Founding of the 14 January Front”

LINK: http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=179104395467783

DATE: 20 January, 2011

Confirming our involvement in the revolution of our people who fought for their right to freedom and national dignity and made sacrifices, represented by dozens of martyr and the thousands of wounded and detainees, in order to reach victory over its enemies, internal and external, and in response to attempts at chaos and plundering those sacrifices, we form the 14 January Front as a policy framework to work for the advance of our people’s revolution, to achieve its aims and respond to counter-revolutionary forces, this framework includes parties, forces and national, progressive and democratic organizations in its foundations.

Its urgent tasks are:

  1. The overthrow of the current Ghannouchi government and any government that includes symbols of the former regime, who applied a policy that was neither national nor popular and served the interests of the ousted president.
  2. Dissolving the RCD and its headquarters, confiscating its property and financial assets, considering them to belong to the people.
  3. The formation of an interim government that enjoys the confidence of the people and progressive forces, political activists, trade unions and youth.
  4. The dismissal of parliament, advisors and all sham bodies and the Supreme Judicial Council and the dismantling of the political structure of the former regime and preparations for elections to a constituent assembly in no more than a year in order to draft a new democratic constitution and legal system and a new framework for public life to ensure the political, economic and cultural rights of the people.
  5. The dissolving of the political police and the enactment of a new security policy with respect for human rights and the rule of law.
  6. Holding accountable all those proven to have looted the people’s money and committed crimes in their duties  like imprisonment, torture and murder, from decisions to execution, as well as all those proven in cases of bribery and misconduct in dealing with public properties.
  7. The confiscation of properties of the former ruling family and their close associates and the associates of all officials who used their position to enrich themselves at the people’s expense.
  8. Providing jobs for the unemployed and taking urgent action to approve granting them coverage by unemployment, social and health benefits and increasing their purchasing power.
  9. Building a national economy that serves the people and places the vital and strategic sectors under state supervision and the nationalization of privatized institutions and the creation of an economic and social policy that breaks with the liberal capitalist approach.
  10. Guaranteeing public and individual freedoms, especially the freedom of demonstrate, the freedom to organize, the freedom of expression and the press, freedom of information and freedom of onscience and the release of detainees and the enactment of a general amnesty law.
  11. The Front salutes the support of the popular masses and progress forces in the Arab region and the world for the revolution in Tunisia and invites them to continue be seized by all possible means.
  12. Rejecting normalization with the Zionist Entity, criminalizing it and supporting liberation movements in the Arab region and the world.
  13. The Front calls for the popular masses and nationalist and progressive forces to continue mobilizing and struggling by all means of legitimate protest, especially in the street, until you have achieved the proposed objectives.
  14. The Front salutes all committees, associations and self-organization for the masses and invites them to expand their involvement in all areas of public affairs and managing various aspects of daily life.

Glory to the martyrs of the intifadhah and victory to the rebellious masses of our people!

– Tunis, 20 January, 2011

Association of Left Workers

The Movement of Nasserist Unionists

The Movement of Nationalist Democrats

Nationalist Democrats (al-Witad)

The Ba’thist Current

Independent Leftists

The Tunisian Communist Workers Party

National Democratic Action Party (PTPD)

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s